Jean

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Jean
JeanDefault.png
Jean, The Mysterious Deliveryman
Aliases Hermes
Gender Male
Place of Origin Europe (Alleged)
Species Human (Alleged)

For the former master, see Jean-Marie
Jean-Marie Clemént is a neutral character that appears in Minotaur Hotel (Visual Novel). He claims to work as a deliveryman and has good knowledge of many places around the world. Much of him is initially surrounded in mystery, even his demeanor is seen changing when from he meets Luke to when he meets Kota. Regardless, he seems to be leading people to find the Hotel, which implies some level of supernaturality to him.

Background[edit | edit source]

Luke I

Jean is described as having a stiff accent with sharp consonants and a chirpy youthful voice. Luke think he smells like fresh laundry.

Jean mentions to Luke that he used to live in Europe but now is more of a traveler, working as a deliveryman.

Calls Luke "birdbrain" when he shouldn't be able to see through the Passport's disguise.

Kota I

Recognizes the Basho haiku Kota was reciting, even continuing it.

in my new clothing
i feel so different, i must
look like someone else

Status[edit | edit source]

Mythology[edit | edit source]

Theories[edit | edit source]

Hermes[edit | edit source]

Jean true identity is Hermes. He knows about the Hotel and is leading people to it. Despite clearly being supernatural (being seen in two largely different places in a short time), he remains in his human form when seen by other Passport holders; this shows that his capabilities surpass those of regular mystic creatures. To conclude, Hermes is the patron god of, among other things, messengers; a deliveryperson is no more than a modern-day messenger.

This theory may be boosted by Jean's words in Luke I, where he says that he appreciates someone who treats travelers properly. One of the famous stories in Ovid's Metamorphoses about Hermes is that of Baucis and Philemon, where a disguised Zeus and Hermes visited a town to test the hospitality of its people, but only the poorest household welcomed them.