Prologue Poems

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Type: Other
Obtainable: N/A

Upon starting a new game, the player will be shown one of seven poems.
The first playthrough will always have the same poem, which presents a general overview of the mythology of the minotaur. Subsequent playthroughs will display a random poem from a pool of six, all of which share the same beginning and end.
The prologue poems are unnamed in the game, but the latter six are concluded with a note speculating about its authorship, which also states they were unearthed in Crete.

First Poem[edit | edit source]

Across the sea you shall find the island of
Crete, from which the tyrant Minos demanded
tribute in the form of Athens' finest youth.

Upon arrival they were sent to a foul location
erected by Daedalus, the great architect.
'Twas a labyrinth in which lived the bull of Minos.

The hybrid was conceived when the tyrant’s
wife, a once-sacred nymph, was stricken by a
lustful curse, making her take the bull's lurch.

The result was the monster called Asterion,
half-bull, half-man. Having no place in nature
he took to consuming human flesh.

He lived in the labyrinth, feeding off of
Athenians. But among the sacrifices came a
distinguished hero, Theseus, future king.

The bright-eyed Athenian captivated the
passions of Princess Ariadne, who revealed
the secret to defeating the minotaur.

Later the victorious prince's bronze sword
shone splendidly under the sun as he and the
princess sailed away from Crete, to Naxos.

Second Poem[edit | edit source]

I sing of Starry-Eyed Asterion, heir of day and night,
sea and earth, whose story I witnessed and now the Muses sing.
Lord Zeus, spur your daughters to grant beauty as sweet-sounding
as was unceasing the hospitality of Poseidon's son.

His mother was a nymph, his sire was Poseidon given mortal form,
his father was Crete's King, Master Archer gifted with far-sight.
He held the hand and followed the footsteps of mighty Androgeus,
flower of Crete plucked too soon by the envious hands overseas.

Asterion had sonorous hooves, whose beat brought joy to the halls,
and his horns framed the moon while we picked crocuses.
When saltwater touched his ankles shells would spring from the sand
and fish would swarm and swim by in honor of Poseidon's ichor.

His lyre, blessed by Apollo, strummed only sweet-sounding tunes
and before his table guests would always find his finest wine.

Farewell, starry heir to the Sun, earthbound son of Poseidon.
Feathers float on the Styx's surface as you make your way
to princely Androgeus in Elysium, resting place of heroes.
The starry night and the cosmos went on, my brother did not.

And so farewell proud son of Poseidon, whose ashes dot the sea,
and thank you sweet-singing Muses who granted talent to this peasant
even if for a single night of mourning.
I shall remember you and another song too.

Unknown Author (presumed Deukalion), estimated 1600 BC.
Unearthed by Matías Corges in Crete.

Third Poem[edit | edit source]

I sing of Starry-Eyed Asterion, heir of day and night,
sea and earth, whose story I witnessed and now the Muses sing.
Lord Zeus, spur your daughters to grant beauty as sweet-sounding
as was unceasing the hospitality of Poseidon's son.

Unjust was his sentence, but the boy's spirit was nothing if not pious.
He tended to Hestia's flame, to her every first and last libation is due.
Every guest earned the full grace of his hospitality, as Zeus commands.

He was cherished among the farmers and their spouses
who garlanded his horns in crocus and dittany when he was a child.
King Minos boasted about his son's archery, and when Asterion reached
the might of adulthood he cherished too his mastery over the labrys.

His back, as wide as the steppes, burst with power while his starry eyes
held only kindness and generosity befitting his sacred lineage.

Farewell, starry heir to the Sun, earthbound son of Poseidon.
Feathers float on the Styx's surface as you make your way
to princely Androgeus in Elysium, resting place of heroes.
The starry night and the cosmos went on, my brother did not.

And so farewell proud son of Poseidon, whose ashes dot the sea,
and thank you sweet-singing Muses who granted talent to this peasant
even if for a single night of mourning.
I shall remember you and another song too.

Unknown Author (presumed Deukalion), estimated 1600 BC.
Unearthed by Matías Corges in Crete.

Fourth Poem[edit | edit source]

I sing of Starry-Eyed Asterion, heir of day and night,
sea and earth, whose story I witnessed and now the Muses sing.
Lord Zeus, spur your daughters to grant beauty as sweet-sounding
as was unceasing the hospitality of Poseidon's son.

His detractors accused him of misanthropy, cowardice, sacrilege.
He partook of his own kind's flesh, they yelled in three voices.

Before the king they pulled him by the horns and spat untold venom.

King Minos, who loved his people, whose sight was far-seeing
but not lie-cutting, sentenced the boy to guard a shrine most sacred
at the labyrinthine heart of Crete.

Farewell, starry heir to the Sun, earthbound son of Poseidon.
Feathers float on the Styx's surface as you make your way
to princely Androgeus in Elysium, resting place of heroes.
The starry night and the cosmos went on, my brother did not.

And so farewell proud son of Poseidon, whose ashes dot the sea,
and thank you sweet-singing Muses who granted talent to this peasant
even if for a single night of mourning.
I shall remember you and another song too.

Unknown Author (presumed Deukalion), estimated 1600 BC.
Unearthed by Matías Corges in Crete.

Fifth Poem[edit | edit source]

I sing of Starry-Eyed Asterion, heir of day and night,
sea and earth, whose story I witnessed and now the Muses sing.
Lord Zeus, spur your daughters to grant beauty as sweet-sounding
as was unceasing the hospitality of Poseidon's son.

His home has as many doors as there are stars in his eyes
and yet none are locked, much like his heart used to.

At the center of it all is a temple, one with a cracked basin
where once raged a great and gentle fire in homage to Hestia.
The basin was surrounded by a pool of clear water, but at its edges
grew barnacles brought forth by the prince's seaworthy ichor.

Farewell, starry heir to the Sun, earthbound son of Poseidon.
Feathers float on the Styx's surface as you make your way
to princely Androgeus in Elysium, resting place of heroes.
The starry night and the cosmos went on, my brother did not.

And so farewell proud son of Poseidon, whose ashes dot the sea,
and thank you sweet-singing Muses who granted talent to this peasant
even if for a single night of mourning.
I shall remember you and another song too.

Unknown Author (presumed Deukalion), estimated 1600 BC.
Unearthed by Matías Corges in Crete.

Sixth Poem[edit | edit source]

I sing of Starry-Eyed Asterion, heir of day and night,
sea and earth, whose story I witnessed and now the Muses sing.
Lord Zeus, spur your daughters to grant beauty as sweet-sounding
as was unceasing the hospitality of Poseidon's son.

Starry-eyed Asterion, lastborn prince of Crete, he was beloved
even if injustice was his yoke and slander his fate.

His detractors overseas would tell tributes were sent to his home
to sate his alleged cannibalistic hunger. But we witnessed that
indeed, every year King Minos would demand tribute overseas,
but in the form of riches as was his right by conquest.

A villain came in among the vessel's crew, none but
the restless Athenian prince who kidnapped princess Ariadne,
murdered Starry-eyed Asterion and profaned his abode.

Farewell, starry heir to the Sun, earthbound son of Poseidon.
Feathers float on the Styx's surface as you make your way
to princely Androgeus in Elysium, resting place of heroes.
The starry night and the cosmos went on, my brother did not.

And so farewell proud son of Poseidon, whose ashes dot the sea,
and thank you sweet-singing Muses who granted talent to this peasant
even if for a single night of mourning.
I shall remember you and another song too.

Unknown Author (presumed Deukalion), estimated 1600 BC.
Unearthed by Matías Corges in Crete.

Seventh Poem[edit | edit source]

I sing of Starry-Eyed Asterion, heir of day and night,
sea and earth, whose story I witnessed and now the Muses sing.
Lord Zeus, spur your daughters to grant beauty as sweet-sounding
as was unceasing the hospitality of Poseidon's son.

Muses, ever so kind to my dear Asterion, please grant this guard
a final breath of song before talent leaves me altogether.
Hear about the man I called brother one last time.

He loved the smell of wooly dittany, when his princely duties
overwhelmed him Androgeus and I garlanded his horns with flowers.
His mother was a nymph, brought to madness in the flower of youth,
who nonetheless at times tried to nurse the white-nosed boy.

His fur was pristine, of a fine white shade that reflected sunlight
thrice as well as the finest polished mirror in the island,
except for the star-shaped birthmark that inspired his name.

He had a pair of horns wherein one could frame the stars and moon.
His hands had such rough knuckles, but nonetheless he
made for an archer so precise the King boasted of his talent.

Farewell, starry heir to the Sun, earthbound son of Poseidon.
Feathers float on the Styx's surface as you make your way
to princely Androgeus in Elysium, resting place of heroes.
The starry night and the cosmos went on, my brother did not.

And so farewell proud son of Poseidon, whose ashes dot the sea,
and thank you sweet-singing Muses who granted talent to this peasant
even if for a single night of mourning.
I shall remember you and another song too.

Unknown Author (presumed Deukalion), estimated 1600 BC.
Unearthed by Matías Corges in Crete.

Topics[edit | edit source]

First Poem[edit | edit source]

  • Naxos - An island in the Aegean Sea, north of Crete.
    • According to legend, the island is where Ariadne was abandoned by Theseus. Some versions claim he was instructed to do so by Dionysus, while others say the Athenian did it on a whim.

Second Poem[edit | edit source]

  • Zeus' Daughters - The muses. Representations and patron deities of many parts of human culture
  • Crocus - The flower from which the spice saffron derives.

Seventh Poem[edit | edit source]

  • Cretan Dittany - A plant that grows exclusively in Crete. In the island's own dialect, it is named erontas (Ancient Greek: έρωντας, love).

Theories[edit | edit source]

Aging Poet[edit | edit source]

Each of the iterations of the poem, were clearly written after Asterion's death. Going through the order listed, one can see that details growing poetic, as if the author is growing nostalgic. Therefore, if the writer is indeed Deukalion, it can be assumed each version was written at different points of his life, with different priorities.