The Gods

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Beings collectively known as Gods or The Olympians are major figures in Minotaur Hotel (Quest) and Minotaur Hotel (Visual Novel). They are are deities with large supernatural power and influence over reality. Recently, however, many think that they have disappeared.

Status[edit | edit source]

• In Chapter 1, Asterion says that many of the gods people worshiped, at least during his time being alive, were real and were quite present among the people, but more often than not the mortals were worse off for it. They often didn't have personal relationships with mortals, but the pantheon was respected/feared; infuriating them had visible consequences. Asterion does not think of them as merciful.

After Asterion died, the gods sentenced to live in the labyrinth for eternity for not fighting his killer, condemned for his meekness.

Although Asterion had been cut off from the gods more or less in the Hotel, from what he had heard, the supernatural had vanished from the world.

• In the Prologue, Clément also speaks to this _____

• In Chapter 2, Asterion reports that he had been sent to Hades, but he is unsure if it exists in the modern-day. He does believe that alternate afterlife realms exist.

• In Chapter 3, Argos says that the entities of the valley have vanished with the absence of a Master. Since The Master had returned, Argos believes that the old kin of the gods will return.

• In Chapter 4, Asterion believes that the gods appreciate the suffering of mortals, so they chose to not bind The Hotel by the restriction of toil so that it would be easy for the Master to make Asterion suffer. He also says that the gods seldom grasp human ingenuity and are confused by change, preferring to keep things the same.

Explicitly Named[edit | edit source]

Athena[edit | edit source]

Statue of Prominence outside the cave. Argos implies that the idea of the Labyrinth was spear-headed by Athena. Patroness of humanity and Athenian heroes like Heracles, Odysseus, and Theseus.

Argos claims that it was not her wish for Masters to bring mercy to the minotaur or that the prison be used "for leisure".

• In Chapter 11, Argos calls both the Master and her the epithet "Bright-eyed" (Glaukopis)

Hades[edit | edit source]

First seen in Chapter 1 as a statue shrine with Cerberus in the Courtyard Garden, surrounded by Asphodel flowers. He is depicted as holding his Invisibility Helm and has his other hand outstretched in a welcoming manner towards the flowers and other people. Seems like a king. Tall yet humble, beckoning his subjects.

• In Chapter 2, Asterion mentions being sent to Hades (Greek Underworld).

Hades took a liking to Asterion, gave him a border patrol job, and even did fighting training together.

• In Chapter 4, Asterion mentions that he once knew a male god who told him that a human lifespan is like the blink of an eye to them; they're akin to pets; this is likely Hades.

• In Hades IV, Asterion calls him the "Lord of Good Council".

• In Chapter 12, if Asterion and the Master sacrifice the Bundle at the Courtyard Garden, Asterion makes a prayer:

"Hades Chthonios, my old general. Long has it been since I tended to your shrine.
Today we come to pay our respects… to Pure Persephone and you.
To the fairest of maidens and to the guide of the fates, a flame born from an ichorous offering and scented with pomegranates.
Underground queen and King, grant us your guidance."

• Described in Chapter 13 as serious and form, but not hostile or malignant. A good and fair monarch who never accepted offerings. Asterion knew that he had a soft spot for his wife, and would bring her fruit and flowers to keep her appeased, Asterion doing it more than most.

Hestia[edit | edit source]

It is implied that the shrine that Asterion had to take care of in the labyrinth is Hestia's, as he mentioned he was taught how to venerate her / perform her rites as a child.

• Invokes her in Chapter 13 when inquiring about why The Master was sent to him, asking if she took pity on him one last time.

• Creator (?) of the Mirror of Hestia. The Hearth in the Hotel Lobby serves as a shrine to her.

• In Chapter 12, if Asterion and the Master sacrifice the Bundle at the Hearth, Asterion makes a prayer:

"Hestia, daughter of Chronos, glorious is your portion and your right in our abode.
Yours is the grace which gives us purpose.
Hestia, you stand highest among deathless gods and the watering men who find rest in this realm.
Come and dwell in our hospitable home in friendship. Grant us your favor in maintaining the hotel's man-made mission.
Hail, Daughter of Chronos. We shall fill this abode with guests and songs in your honor."

Poseidon[edit | edit source]

• Gifted to King Minos a white bull with whom Queen Pasiphaë had an affair. Conceivably could be considered Asterion's father or grandfather.

• In Chapter 3, Argos mentions that Athena's heroes (Heracles, Theseus, Odysseus) take down many of Poseidon's monstrous spawn (his grandsons Geryon and Asterion, his son Polyphemus).

• Invokes him as "Earth-Shattering" (Enosichthon) in Chapter 13 when inquiring about why The Master was sent to him, asking if it was due to his grace.

Charon[edit | edit source]

• Mentioned in Hades: The Ferryman The god which meets Asterion in the Underworld and ferries him across the rivers.

Hermes[edit | edit source]

See Jean.
Bedrock used to be a shrine millennia ago to Hermes. It is implied that Hermes generated the power of the basin. Asteiron doubts that Hermes ever imagine the uses they could come up with the shrine.

• In Chapter 12, if Asterion and the Master sacrifice the Bundle at the Bedrock, Asterion makes a prayer:

"Hermes Psychopompos, let out communication be clear and exchanges fair.
Let our prayers be heard and our insults forgotten
Let our games be good-natured and out works rewarded."

Prometheus[edit | edit source]

• Mentioned by the narrator in Chapter 12 in describing the follies of man. Prometheus would give them fire which they could use to burn offerings to the gods, but instead use it to warm themselves.

Muses[edit | edit source]

Mentioned in some lore.

• In Chapter 12, Asterion invokes them when he plays his lyre, calling them the 9 of Helikon.

The Prayers[edit | edit source]

• In Chapter 13, Asterion, when talking about Phronios' ritual, mentions that they are the recipients of the rite's smoke and bring it to other deities.

Zeus[edit | edit source]

• For the Speedrunner Route, Argos will call on Zeus Olympios to question why he sent The Master.

• If the Sacrifice in Chapter 12 happens at the plateau, Argos praises that an offering happened to Zeus Areius (either "the warlike god" or "the propitiating and atoning god")

• In Chapter 13, he mentions Zeus as the father of The Prayers.

• Mentioned also in the context of the Rape of Europa, bringing her to Crete and having sons with her.

• Invokes Zeus as "Lord of Guests" (Xenios) when inquiring about why The Master was sent to him.

The Graces[edit | edit source]

• In Chapter 13, Asterion mentions them as a possible recipient of the ritual's smoke, delivered to them by the Prayers.

The Fates[edit | edit source]

• In Chapter 13, Asterion mentions them as a possible recipient of the ritual's smoke, delivered to them by the Prayers.

Theorized to be the narrators.

• Narrator voice is the most explicit Luke I if you avert your eyes. Also in Chapter 8 after meeting Greta.

• Are the most explicit about this in Chapter 12, where they say that they do not judge the player, that this is not a trial.


Invokes them in Chapter 13 when inquiring about why The Master was sent to him, asking if he was another trial devised to break him.

The Hours[edit | edit source]

• In Chapter 13, Asterion mentions them as a possible recipient of the ritual's smoke, delivered to them by the Prayers.

Hephaestus[edit | edit source]

• In Chapter 13, in reference to "accessibility settings" in technology, Asterion muses that the Gods had no care for his imperfections.

Persephone[edit | edit source]

Mentioned if you sacrifice the bundle at Hades' statue:
Not much is mentioned about her in-game. Called pure, the fairest of maidens, and Queen by Asterion, and burns pomegranates in her honor.

Although Hades did not accept offerings, Asterion knew that he had a soft spot for his wife, and would bring her fruit and flowers to keep her appeased, Asterion doing it more than most.

Mentioned[edit | edit source]

Eos[edit | edit source]

Eos, the goddess of dawn, is described in Laomedon's Second Tablet as "witless".
According to myth, Eos petitioned Zeus to make her husband, Tithonus, immortal. She forgot, however, to ask him to be made forever young. In the world of Minotaur Hotel this led to his son, Laomedon, seeking out someone who can put an end to his father's misery.

Implied[edit | edit source]

Demeter[edit | edit source]

Apollo[edit | edit source]

Artemis[edit | edit source]

Ares[edit | edit source]

Aphrodite[edit | edit source]

Dionysus[edit | edit source]

Argos mentions "The Twelve" in Chapter 3.